Ask the Cardiologist: How do blood clots develop?

what is a blood clotDr. Maciej Malinski is on the medical staff at Sherman Hospital. He has been kind enough to answer some frequently asked questions related to maintaining a healthy heart. Look for additional heart information from Dr. Malinski in the coming weeks.

Q: How do blood clots usually develop? Can they be prevented? Are there symptoms?

A: Blood clots normally form to stop the bleeding when an artery or vein is damaged, when you experience a cut. However, sometimes blood clots form when you don’t need them, and they can block the flow of blood in artery or vein. A number of conditions can cause you to develop abnormal blood clots, and they require medical attention.

Blood clots forming inside veins in legs may cause you to experience redness, pain and swelling in the affected area, usually a leg. Or, blood clots that form in deep veins can break off and possibly cause a potentially life-threatening condition by traveling from your vein, through your heart. If the clot goes to your lungs, it can cause a pulmonary embolism. The blood clot formed in the artery can cause heart attack or stroke.

Do you have a question for Dr. Malinski? To submit your question, either post it in the comments section below or email luke@shermanhealth.com with the subject line “Question for Dr. Malinski.” For more information on heart health, click here to visit Sherman’s Heart and Vascular Center.

This post is published by Sherman Health to provide general health information. It is not intended to provide personal medical advice, which should be obtained directly from your physician.

About Sherman Health

Sherman Health has provided medical care to Northern IL since 1888, and is currently home to a network of over 600 physicians. The Sherman blogs are edited by me, Luke. Questions? Comments? Links? Email address is luke at shermanhealth dot com.
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